Local History

Greencastle-Antrim
  Museum History
 
     Alexander L. Irwin
  Early History
      Scot-Irish
      Antrim Township
      Ulsterscots of Cumberland Valley (opens new window)
      Allison-Ebbert Home
      Pawling's Tavern
      Underground Railroad
  People
      John Allison
      Jacob B. Crowell
      Corporal Rihl
     
Capt. Ulric Dahlgren
      Henry P. Fletcher
      Samuel F. Snively
      Dolly Harris
      Peter Kuhn Family History 1932
      Physicians
     Timothy Anderson Sr. and Underground Railroad
  Small Business
     
Hostter's Store
      Carl's Drug Store
      Original Water System

  Industries
      Geiser-Emerson-Brantingham
      Walck Cradle Shop
      Century of Industrial Change - 1800's
      Greencastle Elevator

     
Iron Works
      Centre of Cumberland Map, 1913
      Moller Organs
  Buildings
      Train Stations
      Town Hall
      Scout Headquarters

  Recreation
      Old Home Week
      Baseball
 
      Jerome R. King Playground
  Transportation
      Trolley System
  War / Battles
      Corporal Rihl - first Union soldier killed north of the Mason-Dixon line
      Enoch Brown Incident

  Schools
      Brown's Mill School
  Churches

      Evangelical Lutheran Church
 

Mercersburg Area
      James Buchanan / Birthplace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reprinted from the “INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE OF INDUSTRY”,1913,
reviewing the development of Cumberland Valley, the gateway to the South.

 

The Centre of the Cumberland Valley

1913
Situated in the heart of the most fertile part of the Cumberland Valley, equidistant from the mountains on either side, where the Valley is 32 miles in width, has an area of 640 acres, a population of over 2,000, electric lights, gravity water, interurban trolleys north, south, east and west, main line of the Cumberland Valley rail­road giving Pennsylvania standard service north and south, with 14 fast passenger trains daily, and unsurpassed freight service; the proposed Western Maryland lowgrade line, with P. & R. connection east, will pass through the town; has a trading population, within six miles of the town, aggregating 10,000 people, and em­bracing the most fertile agricultural and orchard lands in the Valley. 

 

There are two National banks with deposits of over $700,000, large gasoline engine works, branch of the great Emerson-Brantingham Co,. large knitting mills, planing mill, grain elevator, modern stores, eight churches, two public schools, with eight grades and 4-year First Grade High Schools, with a corps of eleven teachers; three first class hotels, modernly equipped and furnished; fine macadamized local road system, with main State highway route connecting north, south, east and west-a good town to live in. If you are seeking an unexcelled home or factory site address Board of Trade, D. C. Roler, Secretary, Greencastle, Pa.

Return

Local History

Greencastle-Antrim
  Museum History
 
     Alexander L. Irwin
  Early History
      Scot-Irish
      Antrim Township
      Ulsterscots of Cumberland Valley (opens new window)
      Allison-Ebbert Home
      Pawling's Tavern
      Underground Railroad
  People
      John Allison
      Jacob B. Crowell
      Corporal Rihl
     
Capt. Ulric Dahlgren
      Henry P. Fletcher
      Samuel F. Snively
      Dolly Harris
      Peter Kuhn Family History 1932
      Physicians
     Timothy Anderson Sr. and Underground Railroad
  Small Business
     
Hostter's Store
      Carl's Drug Store
      Original Water System

  Industries
      Geiser-Emerson-Brantingham
      Walck Cradle Shop
      Century of Industrial Change - 1800's
      Greencastle Elevator

     
Iron Works
      Centre of Cumberland Map, 1913
      Moller Organs
  Buildings
      Train Stations
      Town Hall
      Scout Headquarters

  Recreation
      Old Home Week
      Baseball
 
      Jerome R. King Playground
  Transportation
      Trolley System
  War / Battles
      Corporal Rihl - first Union soldier killed north of the Mason-Dixon line
      Enoch Brown Incident

  Schools
      Brown's Mill School
  Churches

      Evangelical Lutheran Church
 

Mercersburg Area
      James Buchanan / Birthplace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reprinted from the “INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE OF INDUSTRY”,1913,
reviewing the development of Cumberland Valley, the gateway to the South.

 

The Centre of the Cumberland Valley

1913
Situated in the heart of the most fertile part of the Cumberland Valley, equidistant from the mountains on either side, where the Valley is 32 miles in width, has an area of 640 acres, a population of over 2,000, electric lights, gravity water, interurban trolleys north, south, east and west, main line of the Cumberland Valley rail­road giving Pennsylvania standard service north and south, with 14 fast passenger trains daily, and unsurpassed freight service; the proposed Western Maryland lowgrade line, with P. & R. connection east, will pass through the town; has a trading population, within six miles of the town, aggregating 10,000 people, and em­bracing the most fertile agricultural and orchard lands in the Valley. 

 

There are two National banks with deposits of over $700,000, large gasoline engine works, branch of the great Emerson-Brantingham Co,. large knitting mills, planing mill, grain elevator, modern stores, eight churches, two public schools, with eight grades and 4-year First Grade High Schools, with a corps of eleven teachers; three first class hotels, modernly equipped and furnished; fine macadamized local road system, with main State highway route connecting north, south, east and west-a good town to live in. If you are seeking an unexcelled home or factory site address Board of Trade, D. C. Roler, Secretary, Greencastle, Pa.

Return

Local History

Greencastle-Antrim
  Museum History
 
     Alexander L. Irwin
  Early History
      Scot-Irish
      Antrim Township
      Ulsterscots of Cumberland Valley (opens new window)
      Allison-Ebbert Home
      Pawling's Tavern
      Underground Railroad
  People
      John Allison
      Jacob B. Crowell
      Corporal Rihl
     
Capt. Ulric Dahlgren
      Henry P. Fletcher
      Samuel F. Snively
      Dolly Harris
      Peter Kuhn Family History 1932
      Physicians
     Timothy Anderson Sr. and Underground Railroad
  Small Business
     
Hostter's Store
      Carl's Drug Store
      Original Water System

  Industries
      Geiser-Emerson-Brantingham
      Walck Cradle Shop
      Century of Industrial Change - 1800's
      Greencastle Elevator

     
Iron Works
      Centre of Cumberland Map, 1913
      Moller Organs
  Buildings
      Train Stations
      Town Hall
      Scout Headquarters

  Recreation
      Old Home Week
      Baseball
 
      Jerome R. King Playground
  Transportation
      Trolley System
  War / Battles
      Corporal Rihl - first Union soldier killed north of the Mason-Dixon line
      Enoch Brown Incident

  Schools
      Brown's Mill School
  Churches

      Evangelical Lutheran Church
 

Mercersburg Area
      James Buchanan / Birthplace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reprinted from the “INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE OF INDUSTRY”,1913,
reviewing the development of Cumberland Valley, the gateway to the South.

 

The Centre of the Cumberland Valley

1913
Situated in the heart of the most fertile part of the Cumberland Valley, equidistant from the mountains on either side, where the Valley is 32 miles in width, has an area of 640 acres, a population of over 2,000, electric lights, gravity water, interurban trolleys north, south, east and west, main line of the Cumberland Valley rail­road giving Pennsylvania standard service north and south, with 14 fast passenger trains daily, and unsurpassed freight service; the proposed Western Maryland lowgrade line, with P. & R. connection east, will pass through the town; has a trading population, within six miles of the town, aggregating 10,000 people, and em­bracing the most fertile agricultural and orchard lands in the Valley. 

 

There are two National banks with deposits of over $700,000, large gasoline engine works, branch of the great Emerson-Brantingham Co,. large knitting mills, planing mill, grain elevator, modern stores, eight churches, two public schools, with eight grades and 4-year First Grade High Schools, with a corps of eleven teachers; three first class hotels, modernly equipped and furnished; fine macadamized local road system, with main State highway route connecting north, south, east and west-a good town to live in. If you are seeking an unexcelled home or factory site address Board of Trade, D. C. Roler, Secretary, Greencastle, Pa.

Return